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to space to stem-cell research to name a few. can science stay objective out of politics? alex is co-author of science left behind, feel good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. welcome. >> thank you for having me on. >> sure. you argue here that for all of the talk about republicans being the enemy of science, anti-scientific rhetoric is a by partisan project. tell me how you came to this opinion that democrats are not necessarily the party of science. >> well, on a whole host of issues, so as you know, on the right the conservatives are wrong on evolution and on climate change, and there's this it media narrative that somehow anti-science believes are unique to the right side of the political spectrum. what i found through reading a lot of science is basically that the left side also has some pet ideas not lining up with the scientific mainstream. for instance, opposition to genetic modification. the california democratic party endorsed this proportion to label food in direct opposition to the american medical association. the anti-vaccine movement started on the lef
on them. we we have a far better science now in understanding what mate voted people to vote and a lot of it informed by behavioral psychological research. the science persuasion still pretty vague, and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because we have learned in the last decade how they work. you have the two separate thing. you know when you get to somebody what you can do by increase their likelihood of voting by 2% with i have better techniques to figure out who you talk to about what. i don't think about it necessarily as message or targets. good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front thanked allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for who are the turnout targets who they don't need to talk to until it's time to push them to vote and the persuasion targets. if you're narrowing the people you can presuede you can make the message sharper. you focus the groups in polling and exoormt tal testing to get more closely to the question whether it's 7%, if you're talking 7% who are persuadable and n
it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
and manufacturers who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train two million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. we need to -- [cheers and applause] we need to cut our oil imports in half. create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. and that's why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got -- got an extreme makeover. [applause] but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top-down economics that we've seen before. he thinks that if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that yes, skewed toward the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be solved. jobs
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
and science teachers. and create two million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it. particularly for manufacturing. taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states. on energy governor romney and i we both agree that we've got to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy source of the future like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. now, in order for us to do it we have to close our deficit and one of the things i'm sure we'll be discussing tonight is how do we deal with our tax cod
science professor matthew krenston said the poll reveals unlikely allies united in opposition and for different reasons. >> for republican, gambling represents way to get resources for the expansion of government without having to impose tax. way of short circuiting the political system. that's probably why they are opposed to that. for african-americans, reasons may be a little more complex. first, many belong to religious denominations that take a dim view of gambling. second, the largest concentration of african-americans in the state is this country where the new casino would go. >> pollsteres all probed who feels more intense about the issue? 54% of those claiming that expanded gaming is most likely to get them out to the polls plan to vote against it. so the pro and con tv ads may not be helping either side's cause. >> i think if they succeeded in making people angry on both sides. >> that was david collins reporting. >>> imagine 80% voter turnout in the united states. believe it or not, that was the actual statistic voting in the 2008 presidential election in one segmen
is absolutely right, we need more of stem education, science, engineering, math, technology. there is a clear path to solving this problem. it basically must recognize we have to start producing as much or more than we consume. this whole thing about going to the walmart, yeah, it's cheap there but we have to understand the consequences. >> let me ask you about this. consumer confidence is up, a n cnnorc poll asks how the economy will be a year from now. two-thirds think it will be in better shape. that american optimism is critical but we can't fall into the traps by buying cheap stuff we don't need, it's all imported. >> nobody says it's not needed. imagine living without your iphone. >> a pair of tennis shoes. >> i agree with the point our new growth and prosperity will be made out of technology and we need education. we can't do that by bashing china. i tell you why. they are the largest foreign holder of our now $16 trillion national debt. they own over $1 trillion of u.s. treasuries. they lend to us. we buy stuff, they get dollars and then they invest back into our treasury bills, clo
. i came out with specific points that you want to make but the science of how you receive an attack, decide whether you are going to use your debate real estate to respond to the attack and how quickly you pivot to offense, offense on the point you want to make or offense against your opponent. and that to me is fascinating to watch. >> john: and we may see both candidates playing it is safe tonight knowing they have two more debates. >> al gore: i don't think so. i think the developed wisdom is the first debate matters the most. >> john: gets the highest rating. >> al gore: yeah and sets the template. and early voting has already started in a lot of these states. >> john: yeah. >> al gore: and i think mitt romney has got to take some risks, and i'm sure he has been practicing this art we talked about before. being aggressive without seeming mean. >> john: uh-huh. >> eliot: debite tonight, job numbers friday. so i think he has got to seize the moment tonight. >> cenk: when we come back we'll go to michael shure in san francisco because we'll show us
-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. he is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of the new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard" which he founded in 1995. prior to that, he led the publican -- republican feature. he also has served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. all of you see him regularly on fox news sunday and the fox news channel. i met him in 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. the question that i would like to pose for each of you, and i will start with governor what does this through feel about the leadership styles of mitt romney and president obama? >> probably not much. >> ok, will this panel is over. [laughter] >> you could extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that may be instructive. he is not the manager. he does out of a history of managing things. you bring in a lot of good, well trained people and give them tasks and try
. but us start the national academy of sciences. let us start colleges. because we want to give the gateways of -- date was of opportunities for all americans. all americans are getting opportunities, that enhances people's freedom. what i have tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. >> that is president obama from the debate this week on the role of government. let us listen to his challenger mitt romney with his answer. and then we will begin listening to you. [video clip] >> have a responsibility to and libertiesthe lives of the american people. in another one that says we are endowed by our creator with our rights, i believe we must maintain our commitment to religious tolerance and freedom in this country. the statement also says that we are endowed by our creator with the right to pursue happiness as we choose. i interpret that as one making sure that those people who are less fortunate that cannot care for themselves are cared for by one another. we are a nation of belize we are all children of the same god. and we care for those that have difficulties
how we hire teachers. not to hire new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree are corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing. taken it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that give incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states upon energy. governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible. now in order for us to do agree how to to close our deficit in one of the things we will discuss tonight is how do we do with our tax code and how do we make sur
. it is not rocket science. dave: some people say it had its run up and particularly folks are now focused more on the stocks more than they already have been gold lose the love its luster? >> i disagree. a couple things are pushing gold higher which will help will remain attractive through the end of the year. the fed continues to add liquidity and joined by other global central banks and adding more liquidity so the global financial system should benefit gold but more importantly for today specifically there is chatter about the devaluation of the iranian currency raising tensions and another spot in the middle east you add that to what is going on in the syria/turkish border and real significant margin money accounts in the middle east are getting defensive and adding to their gold holdings and that is driving it as well. dave: we will see when a couple minutes. good to see you. thank you for coming in. thanks to both of you. business owners listening intently to the debate last night trying to figure out whose plans they should prepare for. once successful businessman making plans of his ow
years of english, three years of science, math, and social science, compared to those who didn't complete a core curriculum, those who completed the core curriculum scored 144 points higher than those who did not. when we look at those who took honors courses, they scored nearly 300 points above those who did not take honors or ap courses. rigor of the academic course load in high school leads to do better on the s.a.t. and leads students to being better prepared for college. let me give you this information in terms of framing the challenge of our country faces. for every 100 ninth graders, only 70 will graduate from high school. 44 local want to college. only 30 students will enroll in the second year of college. only 21 will graduate from a four-year institution in a six- year period of time. that is not good enough to keep the united states competitive in a global economy. we are very much focused on having high expectations for all students and doing what we can to better prepare students for college success and keep those high expectations for all students coming from all
skills here in the united states. so we're going to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers, ande're going to improve early childhood education and we're going to create two million more slots in community colleges so that workers can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. we are going to continue to do everything we need to do to cuts the growth of tuition costs because every young person in america should have the opportunity to go to college without being loaded up with hundreds -- with tens of thousands of dollars worth much debt. >> president obama is speaking probably for the first time since what many saw as a disastrous debate last night. we're going to be following the president today and also tomorrow. it's going to be another huge day for politics. it's when the latest jobs numbers come out. our own ali velshi is going to give you a look at how crucial the figures could be in the presidential race. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two mo
the transcontinental railroad. let's start the national academy of sciences. let's start land grant colleges, because we want to give these gateways of opportunity for all americans because if all americans are getting opportunity we're all going to be better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom. that enhances it. so what i've tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. and when it comes to education what i've said is we've got to reform schools that are not working. we used something called race to the top. it wasn't a top-down approach, governor. what we've said to states, we'll give you more money if you initiate reforms. and as a consequence, you had 46 states around the country who have made a real difference. but what i've also said is let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead to make sure our skilled and able to succeed and hard-pressed states right now can't all do that. in fact we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't think we need more tea
science. you don't want to pick winners and losers in the companies that are going to survive. national science foundation obviously. >> good loan guarantees can be targeted. there are many ways to do things. one of the things that arianna has been discussing and i've found very compelling is this notion that we should provide opportunities and channels for national service in a variety of industries. this is something industry could do. i've been very involved with teach for america but you could have not only a teacher's corps, you could have medical corps, you could have financial services corps of young people coming out of college, having trouble finding a job but with industry associations, companies saying we're going to create interns and a service program where people can work for a year, maybe two years, learning a trade, learning a profession, whether they're trying to do legal services for america or financial services for america, or health or for that matter engineering, encoding, i think there are many ways for the private sector to work together with government to say he
is clearly -- doesn't even understand the science of a woman's body, over a democrat. that just seems kind of -- everything you're saying is right but just with todd akin he's not just like -- it wasn't a gaffe. it's just odd. >> remember it wasn't a gaffe. he sponsored a bill on this. >> yes. >> cosponsored by paul ryan. it wasn't just -- it wasn't a slip of the tongue. this was their position. the entire, you know, house had been, you know -- the tea party wing of the house had been fighting for this. >> the reason they can get away with it in this race, think back mark foley became a national issue in a congressional race in 2006 where it was bad for the party nationally. because it's a presidential year, there's so much more attention that's going to go on the presidential election it is likely the case that the party -- you won't have a national discussion over this anymore over -- even though you might in other cases. the price is probably relatively low. as ryan was saying, if they are amoral things more important to try to win the majority than worry about the longer term implicati
, recruiting and training math and science teachers to get our children prepared for those important jobs. >> those are goals. those are goals and mitt romney has goals. but when are -- >> no, no andrea -- >> specific. >> it is not a goal to end tax breaks for companies that move jobs overseas and incentivize them to come back and create a million jobs in manufacturingp. we've seen the greatest increase in manufacturing jobs in more than 20 years under this president. so we have a sense of what has to happen in order to bring those businesses back and create those jobs. those aren't goals. you know, reducing our dependence on foreign oil by increasing our domestic production incentivizing clean energy to create jobs and put people back to work, those aren't goals, those are plans to continue to move this economy forward. look, i also hope that mitt romney will take some of the time paul ryan didn't want to take in his interview this weekend and try to explain the arithmetic behind their budget. paul ryan said it would take too long to explain their budget plan. the problem isn't the time
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
excellent question, scott. race has no biological basis. science rejects the concept. that's why when people ascribe biological certainties to race, they sound racist, but race is real as a social construct. it has so much social and political meaning and it's shaped so much of society that even if you think you're color blind, the perceptions of race are so baked into society you can't even easily super seisedem by being myopic. as dr. lopez once wrote, social meanings connect our faces to our souls, race is neither an essence nor an illusion but rather an ongoing contradictory self-reinforcing process subject to the macro forces of social and political struggle and the microeffects of daily decisions. that does to for the cycle. do you have any good on the show today? >> yes and you have stolen 40 seconds of my show and i'm not going to talk to you. good news for america fuels a republican conspiracy theory bigger than alien abduction. ♪ >> this morning we found out that the unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level since i took office. >> there is widespread mistrust
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." now filling in for bill, here's john fuglesang. >> john: i have the best ring in town. if you call me during the show, will you hear the coolest ring tone. >> is that right? joan the pop song of the past four years that makes the coolest possible ring tone. >> i'm tempted to call you. >> john: i will have to share it. everyone will steal it. when you have a pop song come out of your phone, it is usually jarring. i found the perfect one. it is the rolling stones. this is the "bill press show." you have to guess which show. i'm john fuglesang filling in for bill all morning long. we're taking your calls. apparent there is a debate tomorrow. i wish the media would talk about this a little bit. i've never seen the media talk about something that hasn't happened yet more than they talk about the stuff
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
creation that is better than most states. we have in our science and technology sector, very strong sector growing, life science, biotech, i.t., professional services, health care with johns hopkins and others. >> governor? >> yes, sir. >> we had already, when the president proposed the american jobs act, we had already been over letting the bush tax cuts expire just for the rich, and keeping them for people less than 250. we had already had that argument three or four times and it was clear from the composition of congress at the time that the president put forth the american jobs act that there was no way that was going to happen. so letting it, where that was going to be a provision in the american jobs act was pure political posturing and in no way, he knew there was no way that that was going to pass. i just take issue with you saying that this was all republicans saying that they weren't going to, they were going to make sure the jobless rate was much higher. he knew full well that he could back them into the obstructionist corner by saying that we're definitely going to do that, mak
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
cyber networks and systems safe. we have a strong science and technology directorate that has worked cooperatively to develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. among its many projects, it is leading efforts to develop more secure internet protocol to protect consumers and industry. because each member of the public plays an important role in cyber security, which sponsored a campaign which is a year-round effort designed to engage and challenged americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe on-line practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. if you are not already a friend of the campaign, i encourage you to join today. in a few days, we will kick off national cyber security awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and resilient cyber environment. we must work internationally because the cyber criminals do not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from an
on this one. you think of people like steve balmer, jim cramer. >> but there is science behind this. >> more testosterone. >> it's the testosterone that kills the hair. you're more aggressive. you're an aggressor. >> how do you keep your hair? >> if zucker was still -- i would be nicer, he has a full head of hair so i'm not afraid right now. if some guy who is unfortunately is bald happens to end up in a powerful position, it's not because of being bald, it's in spite of being bald. toupees look like crap. you can't buy a decent toupee. >> rarely bald anymore. maybe works in business, not in politics, i don't know. kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> the markets are truly sandwiched between politics and the economy. the debate last night, a lot of data today and tomorrow including the jobs number. and the opening bell. the s&p 500 at the top of your screen over the big board, steelcase, maker of business furniture. you might be sitting on some right now, celebrating its 100th anniversary over at the nasdaq. net element international, a mobile commerce and payment processing company celebrating its ipo today. and jim, there have been several of those, although, as we saw from lifelock, not all of them going the way the companies had wished. >> no, it's interesting, this company that's becoming public, it is a terrific household name. they make a lot of plastics that we all use, hard plastics is really their major initiative. plastic uses a lot of natural gas, which means that the margins should be going up. nobody cares. >> yeah, it priced below the range. bery is the ticker. it debuts here on the stock exchange. meantime, hewlett-packard, hitting another new low, down 1.5%. we di
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we've heard it all morning long it and still makes us jump. a huge 747 crashing in the dessert, by remote control, all part of the discover channel's new "curiosity" series where a controlled experiment was captured by 40 cameras and sensors to give researchers what happens during a crash atlantaing. >> it airs on discovery channel this sunday night at 9 p.m. two top experts are here with us now, accident investigator dr. tom barth and dr. cindy bir. >> thank you for being with us this morning. we're very excited about this. >> i asked you, dr. bir, earlier, have you ever attempted to do this before and you said you have. this took over four years to plan. why did you want to crash a plane? >> we were -- i was approached by a production company to do this about four years ago. i think tom and i were approached about the same sometime. and was just such an interesting project. i didn't attempt it before, but it was attempted back in '84. and they had lessons learned. we have new technology. so, it was a wonderful opp
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. septic disasters are disgusting and costly, but avoidable. the rid-x septic subscriber program helps prevent backups by sending you monthly doses right to your door so you will never forget to maintain your system. sign up at rid-x.com. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation on your radio >> broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv. this is the bill press show. >> it is tweeted paul ryan is so frustrated with mitt romney, he hopes liam neeson comes to rescue the campaign. i'm john fugelsang sitting in for bill. thank you so much for spending your morning with us. we are taking your calls at 866-55-press. we're talking all about the debate this week and all about the campaign. we are talking about the gift of comedy that is jerry brown's admirable of banning reparative gay behavior. >> i think you cover issues that a lot of men care about too. >> i hope men care about those issues. >> a lot of men care about
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
nomg or science that we stable an h1b visa to them so they can stay in this country and help grow jobs here. he has always made keeping families together part of his comprehensive immigration reform. >> but he has never said that he would let these visas stand that the president just granted. >> no, no, no. what you just said to me was he said he was going to have it taken care of. meaning that he has said that among his top priorities would be working with congress, enacting a comprehensive immigration reform. of which keeping families together would be part ofhat program. so i think it's totally consistent with what he said, because it's a top priority of his to get done. and unlike this president, he would get it done in the first two years of his administration. >> it may be consistent but you do agree what he told the denver post last night is new. it is new news as we say in the news business. he's never said that before. >> well, you may be saying he never used those same words in the same sentence before. but if you go ahead and look at mitt romney dotcom where he laid out his
, and then we hear from a political science professor of columbia university with a preview of tomorrow's debate between president obama and mitt romney, with robert erikson. "washington journal" wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> president obama and mitt romney are wrapping up their preparations for their first debate. mr. romney in denver and president obama in henderson, nevada. we look at the c-span archival video from past presidential debates to determine whether presidential debates still matter. this hour-long program begins with an update from wall street journal correspondent laura meckler, with how the candidates are preparing for tomorrow night. >> laura meckler, as we look at the first of three presidential debates, this one taking place on the campus of the university of denver, this has been the debate season of expectation by the obama and romney campaigns. what has happened? >> the expectations are being set on two different levels. you have the obama and romney campaigns talking about how great the other guy is. the people in the obama camp cannot stop praising mitt r
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
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